Brethren of the Great Lakes Dockside
July 30, 2014, 06:06:30 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Don't fergit t' visit th' Michigan Pirate Festival website:  www.michiganpiratefestival.com
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Lake Erie  (Read 3541 times)
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
Captain Black Roger
Captain
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 855


Captain Black Roger


WWW
« on: February 08, 2009, 08:55:49 am »



Lake Erie is the most shallow and the southernmost of the five Great Lakes. Lake Erie was carved out by the receding glaciers of the Great Ice Age. Evidence of this may be seen in the Glacial Grooves on Kelleys Island, the largest accessible glacial grooves in the world.

The busiest of all the lakes today, Erie was the last of the upper lakes to be discovered by white men, who took a short cut across the country that lay above Lake Ontario and the larger yellow Lake with the green rush shore. They followed a navigator's straight line west along the 46th parallel, historic paddle-and-portage route of Champlain and Nicolet, via the Ottawa River and across Lake Nipissing to Georgian Bay.



Lake Erie is 241 miles long and 57 miles wide.
It has a surface area of 9,910 square miles.
The average depth of Lake Erie is 62 feet.
The maximum depth is 210 feet.
The maximum width of the lake is 57 miles
There are 24 Lake Erie islands

There are 24 islands in Lake Erie, nine of which belong to Canada. Among the largest and most interesting islands are Kelleys Island, home of the Glacial Grooves; South Bass Island, home to Put-in-Bay; Johnson's Island, home to a Civil War Cemetery; Canada's Pelee Island; and Middle Bass Island, home to the closed Lonz Winery.

Lake Erie is 241 miles long and 57 miles width at its largest points. It is fed Lake Huron and Lake St. Clair via the Detroit River (in the west) and drains into the Niagara River and Niagara Falls in the East. Other tributaries include (west to east) the Maumee River, the Sandusky River, the Huron River, the Cuyahoga River, and the Grand River.

Lake Erie creates its own microclimate along its shores (within about 10 miles inland), making this area fertile and popular for wineries, nurseries, and apple orchards. Lake Erie is also well know for its Lake Effect snow storms, the result of weather patterns picking up moisture from the lake and depositing it at the eastern edge, from Mentor to Buffalo, in the form of snow.

Lake Erie is dotted with beaches from southern Michigan to New York. Some are sand and some are composed of small rocks. Near Cleveland, some of the most popular beaches are Huntington beach in Bay Village, Edgewater Beach near downtown, and Headlands State Park, near Mentor.

Major ports along Lake Erie include Cleveland, Ohio; Buffalo, New York; Erie Pennsylvania; Monroe, Michigan; and Toledo, Ohio.



The area surrounding Lake Erie was originally inhabited by the Erie native American tribe, from whom the lake takes its name. This peaceful tribe was conquered and killed by the Iroquois in the 17th century. The land was later peopled by the Ottawa, Wyandot, and Mingo tribes. The first European to record Lake Erie was the French trader and explorer Louis Jolliet in 1669, and Lake Erie was the last of the Great Lakes to be discovered. The first ship to navigate the Great Lakes was the "Griffon," a little vessel of about sixty tons, built in 1679 by the French explorer, La Salle. This ship was launched into the Niagara River about the present site of the village of La Salle, and Lake Erie was the first lake to have it sail on. On August 7th, 1679, the Griffon, loaded with supplies for a long trip of exploration, sailed up the lakes.  Very little is recorded of the trip but the supposition is that the north shore of Lake Erie was followed until the entrance to the Detroit river was found, and on Lake Huron the west shore was followed to the Straits of Mackinac. Early in September the little ship had reached Green Bay.  Here La Salle loaded her with furs that had been purchased from the Indians, and ordered his captain to take her back to Lake Erie.  La Salle did not accompany the ship but with part of his men he started overland on his trip of exploration.  The Griffon was never heard from afterward, no doubt having foundered in a gale with her entire crew.

During the War of 1812, Lake Erie played a strategic role, most famously in the Battle of Lake Erie, where Oliver Hazard Perry defeated the British in a sea contest near Put-in-Bay. The victory is commemorated with the Perry monument on South Bass Island.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2009, 01:49:33 pm by Count dBooty » Logged

Cap'n Black Roger
"To Err is human, to ARR is Pirate!"


Don't fergit t' visit th' Leather Lore t' see all me wares! www.leatherlore.com
Admiral Morgan
Pirate Lord
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2405



« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2009, 09:27:20 am »

The Lake Erie 'Storm Hag', demonic siren of the Great Lakes
by Paster Hope     

http://www.examiner.com/x-4872-Pittsburgh-Paranormal-Examiner~y2009m4d17-The-Lake-Erie-Storm-Hag-demonic-siren-of-the-Great-Lakes



Since first explored in the 1600’s the Great Lakes have earned a reputation as being a treacherous and unforgiving waterway. Extremely violent storms seem to appear out of nowhere taking both vessel and crew to a watery grave.

In 1977 author Jay Gourley’s “The Great Lakes Triangle” proposed there were some sinister forces behind all of these mysterious disappearances. But many sailors on Lake Erie at least, have had a theory for centuries on the unexplainable storms and the shipwrecks that plague the fresh water lake.

The Storm Hag.


According to legend the Storm Hag lives at the bottom of the lake, close to Presque Isle Peninsula . She is a hideous she demon, her yellow eyes shine in the dark like those of a cat, her skin is a pale shade green. Her teeth are sharp and pointed as a shark, able to tear the skin off of her victims. They are also green, which gives her another less common name, Jenny Greenteeth. Her hands have long pointed nails like talons that have a poison with which she can paralyze a poor soul with just one small prick. Her arms are long and strong, and they wrap around her victims making it impossible for them to escape her flesh hungry attack.

The old legend tells that like a siren before she attacks she sings a quiet song over the waves that few have survived to retell. Traditionally the song she sings is:

“Come into the water, love,
Dance beneath the waves,
Where dwell the bones of sailor lads
Inside my saffron caves.”

And as soon as the seafarer hears this song the Storm Hag attacks. She calls up a violent storm that tosses the crew of the vessel around so she can lurch up from the water and grab them with her long arms. Others tell that she waits the storm out and when the sailors believe all is calm she rises from the waves, spitting lightning and winds with such force the entire vessel sinks in a few seconds.

Local history has it that on a fall evening in 1782 an owler ship was caught in a bad storm on the lake and desperately tried to make it back to port at Presque Isle. It was tossed to and fro violently for more than an hour and when it was in site of land the storm abruptly stopped.

The clouds dissipated and the moonlight from the full moon illuminated the water, and the sailors could see they were less than a mile from the northern edge of the Peninsula and home.

Without warning the water next to the boat foamed and the Storm Hag burst forth from the surface. She spewed venom and attacked the crew unleashing her fury upon them.


Within seconds the ship and its crew were taken beneath the waves to their doom.

Witnesses on shore apparently heard the screams of the sailors echoing across the lake just before the vessel disappeared.

To this day some of those who sail the lake near Presque Isle claim to hear phantom screams of the victims who were taken long ago.

Now these legends seem the work of over imaginative sailors until one looks at some very disturbing incidents documented within the last century.

On December 1942 the oil tanker Clevco was being escorted with towline by the tugboat Admiral. They had left port at Toledo and were traveling east when just off the coast of Cleveland when something strange happened. At 4am the Clevco radioed that the Admiral had disappeared without incident. The crew noted that the towline was no longer attached to the tugboat but it was at a sharp angle into the waves, as if the tugboat had somehow sunk to the bottom of the lake without a sound.

The Clevco immediately stopped and radioed the Coast Guard and two cutters and a few motorboats were dispatched to the coordinates. However arriving on scene they found nothing.

Both ships had vanished.

The next morning the Civil Air Patrol joined the search, and pilot Clara Livingston spotted the Clevco 15 miles south from its original location. As soon as she reported the location to the Coast Guard her radio went dead and she saw the ship disappear as a cloud of snow fell upon the ship from out of nowhere. Since her radio had died she returned to base. The Coast Guard again went to the location and found nothing. They widened the search and the hunt continued.

Strangely, later in the day the cutter Ossipee spotted the tanker and when almost in range to board her, once again the snow storm phenomena appeared and the vessel once again disappeared.

Then at 3:30 amazingly the Clevco once again was in radio contact with the Coast Guard. They told them the ship was adrift and they were unable to steer her. While in contact with them for over an hour the authorities told them to dump their oil so the rescuers could more readily find them. But at 4:30 the contact with the Clevco ceased and it was never heard from nor seen again.

Early the next morning bodies of two crew members of the Clevco washed ashore near Cleveland, their lifejackets covered in oil. No other crew members were found, living or dead.

Then there is the mysterious disappearance of Captain George Donner.

In April of 1937 the freighter O.M. McFarland left Presque Isle for Port Washington, Wisconsin. The Captain retired to his cabin for the evening and instructed the first mate to notify him when they were nearing their destination.

According to the Cleveland Press of April 29th 1937,

"At 1:15 a.m. (April 29, 1937--J.T.) as the McFarland neared Port Washington, the mate, as instructed, descended to the captain's room to summon him. There was no response to his knocking on the door, so the second officer opened it and peered in, assuming that the captain was merely sleeping heavily. But Captain Donner was not in the bed or anywhere else in sight."

"On the possibility that the captain had walked aft to get coffee or partake of the night lunch, the mate hurried back to the galley, but except for a couple of off-duty firemen finishing a midnight snack, it was deserted. Quickly summoning the other mate and the chief engineer, he organized a thorough search of the McFarland, crew members combing every nook and cranny of the thirty-four year-old vessel. Without a doubt, Captain Donner had disappeared!"
"Ships along the McFarland's route were asked to keep a watch for Donner's body, and the same request was passed on to communities along the shore."

CaptainDonner's body was never found, it was as if he was snatched off the face of the earth.


Was Donner a victim of the Strom Hag?

His disappearance does fit the tradition of the legend.

Is there a demonic entity that lurks at the bottom of Lake Erie near Presque Isle which takes the unwary navigator to their death?

Surely the number of shipwrecks on the lake within recorded history gives one pause.

Are they victims of odd meteorological phenomena or a sinister paranormal entity that holds sway over the area?

« Last Edit: April 24, 2009, 09:00:09 am by Captain Black Roger » Logged

Admiral Morgan Ramirez MD
Pirate Lord of Lake Huron
Proprietess of of the Guiness Pub, Port of Holly
Morgan's Privateer Pub, Port Royale
Only child of Sir Henry Morgan Esquire
President BGL
www.brethrenofthegreatlakes.com
www.michiganpiratefestival.com
facebook: BRETHRENOFTHEGREATLAKES
Admiral Morgan
Pirate Lord
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2405



« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2009, 10:58:21 am »

Thursday, October 8, 2009

Winds push Lake Erie levels down on western edge

Jim Lynch / The Detroit News

Lake Erie  has recovered from the second seiche to hit its western coastal areas in the last two weeks. High winds hitting the lake have the capacity to push back waters from the shore -- sometimes by hundreds of yards. A seiche creates a bathtub effect -- with water sloshing to one side. On Tuesday, sustained winds out of the west pushed Erie's waters, causing levels to rise in eastern areas.

In Buffalo, city officials issued a flood warning Wednesday, but little damage was reported. By late Wednesday, the waters had moved back west. "We're where we usually are at this time of year," said Sandy Bihn, the Western Lake Erie Waterkeeper. "The lakes levels naturally get lower in the fall, which exacerbates the problem."
Logged

Admiral Morgan Ramirez MD
Pirate Lord of Lake Huron
Proprietess of of the Guiness Pub, Port of Holly
Morgan's Privateer Pub, Port Royale
Only child of Sir Henry Morgan Esquire
President BGL
www.brethrenofthegreatlakes.com
www.michiganpiratefestival.com
facebook: BRETHRENOFTHEGREATLAKES
Jon Foster
Able Seaman
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 335



WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2009, 01:51:06 pm »

A Seiche can be extremely deadly. There have been cases where the winds died down and the waters rushed back to their normal levels. Entire homes have been destroyed by them. Apparently it's pretty common in Michigan. The first time I heard of a Seiche was after I experienced one. Like an idiot I walked out "onto" the floor of Lake Erie a long long way from the shore. I took the opportunity to pick up junk that normally would have been covered by 10 or 20 feet of water and snapped pictures etc. I'll post a couple of them later...

Jon.
Logged

Watch it! I'll shoot ye with me Canon.
Jon Foster
Able Seaman
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 335



WWW
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2009, 10:27:02 pm »

This was a house we worked on. It was on Erie just north of the Ohio/Michigan border. It doesn't look like it but there are 5 stories in the house. Some of the floors are actually half floors. To get to them you crawl through doors and hallways that are about 3 feet high. Each floor is a different theme. One floor is a desert, another is a castle etc. The top floor looks out over everything in the area... The water is usually at the sea wall and from the marks it looks like it's about half way up. Standing at the foot of the wall you can almost touch the top.



Here's the best booty I found on the floor of the lake too. Never opened!



Jon.
Logged

Watch it! I'll shoot ye with me Canon.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.16 | SMF © 2011, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!